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Ford/HP to transform 3D waste into automotive parts

Ford and HP to collaborate on an industry first, transforming 3D waste into automotive parts

|Mar 26|magazine5 min read

Leading the sustainable revolution and driving the future of automotive 3D printing (additive printing), Ford has partnered with HP to innovatively reuse 3D printed powders and parts turning them into injection molded vehicle parts.

“Finding new ways to work with sustainable materials, reducing waste and leading the development of the circular economy are passions at Ford. Many companies are finding great uses for 3D printing technologies, but, together with HP, we’re the first to find a high-value application for waste powder that likely would have gone to landfill, transforming it into functional and durable auto parts,” commented Debbie Mielewski, Ford technical fellow, Sustainability.

Sustainability: a priority for both Ford and HP

Jointly exploring innovative solutions, Ford and HP have developed a sustainable solution that is better for the environment, while maintaining the durability and quality standards Ford and its customers require. 

Ford is using the recycled materials to manufacture injection-molded fuel-line clips installed first on Super Duty F-250 trucks. When compared to conventional versions, the new parts have a better resistance to chemicals and moisture, as well as being 7 per cent lighter and cost 10 per cent less.

Ford has already identified 10 additional existing fuel-line clips that would benefit from this innovative method, with plans to harness this method in future models.

“You get more sustainable manufacturing processes with 3D, but we are always striving to do more, driving our industry forward to find new ways to reduce, reuse and recycle powders and parts. Our collaboration with Ford extends the environmental benefits of 3D printing even further, showcasing how we are bringing entirely different industries together to make better use of spent manufacturing materials, enabling a new circular economy,” added Ellen Jackowski, chief sustainability and social impact officer, HP.

Did you know? Company wide, Ford plans to have 100 per cent sustainable materials in its vehicles.

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